Home
Home

People

Keren Ladin

Keren Ladin

Keren Ladin

Keren Ladin graduated with General and Departmental Honors from the University of Chicago with an AB in History and History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine in 2005, and received an MSc in Population and International Health from the Harvard School of Public Health in 2007. During her graduate studies, Keren focused on health disparities, particularly research exploring pathways by which social inequality affects health and well-being. During her time at HSPH, she also worked on health care reform in Santiago de Chile, and served on the boards of the Student Advisory Committee, Harvard Health Policy Forum, and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Organization. In 2006, Keren served as a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies of Science, where she contributed to the evaluation of PEPFAR with the Board of Global Health. Keren’s Master’s Thesis, entitled "Social Inequality and Depression: Causal Pathways and the Influence of Absolute and Relative Position in Determining Health Outcomes", was published, awarded the departmental Thesis Prize, and presented at the APHA 2007 Annual Conference. Keren received a Graduate Research Award from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) to pursue this research as a Research Fellow the Mannheim Research Institute for the Economics of Aging (MEA). While at MEA, Keren wrote on a number of topics, including: cross-national variations in utilization of health services among older Europeans, international disparities in health of migrants in later life, and behavioral determinants of health in later life, particularly relating to the decision to seek health care.

Since 2007, Keren has been exploring causal pathways and mechanisms underlying disparities across various stages of the transplantation process at the Center for Transplant Outcomes and Quality Improvement in the Transplant Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. At BIDMC, Keren’s research is largely focused on understanding the role of social determinants in predicting successful referral and evaluation, transplantation and subsequent life chances of minorities with End Stage Renal Disease. Incorporating new empirical findings, Keren’s research is aimed at evaluating current organ allocation schemes while exploring new models for ethical resource allocation and priority setting for policies affecting dialysis and transplantation in vulnerable populations.